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Staff were in the field yesterday (woohoo!) and got to check out the landscape-shaping impact of beaver. At this location, beaver started building with cobble-size rocks in 2014 and the landowners were sure that kids had snuck in and placed the rocks. When they started seeing other beaver sign, however, they realized that their seasonally inundated prairie and wet meadows were likely to become wetter for more of the year. Now, with a sizeable impoundment built and active lodge nearby, the landowners are delighted to have a large wetted area for waterfowl, brushy edge habitat for song birds, and improved fish habitat downstream. We love working with landowners who embrace what the watershed brings and we are so excited to see the continuing evolution here. 🦫#beaver #beaverrestoration #castorcanadensis #beaverdam #habitatrestoration Photo 1. Water flowing from a pond over a beaver dam, taken from downstream side. Green grass on the bank below the dam, dam constructed of brown wood with green, growing vegetation, against a grey sky with white clouds. Photo 2. Water flowing from a pond over a beaver dam, taken from pond side. Willows and spirea grown from the top of the dam structure. Dark water of the pond, light brown and green on the dam, grey sky. Photo 3. An active beaver lodge. Brown sticks and small logs piled into a dome shape, packed with brown mud and some green, growing vegetation. Photo 4. An expansive view of the pond backed up behind the beaver dam. Rippling dark water up to a brushy edge, grey sky with white clouds against a forested hill in the background. On the ancestral lands of the Kalapuya, Tsankupi, and Santiam peoples.

By Webmaster / December 8, 2021
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Another excellent webinar from OSU Extension coming up this week. This is the fourth in a series and each of the previous webinars is available to view from their website. This free educational program is designed to provide information for all Oregonians to be knowledgeable about fire and fire prevention practices. Link in bio!#osuextension #firewise

By Webmaster / December 6, 2021
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Live outdoor education is back! Last weekend, we got to host a table at a STEM day event hosted by the Girl Scouts of Oregon and SW Washington at the Willamette Heritage Center. After more than a year and half, it was such a joy to see smiling faces (100% masked!) both on kids and their adults alike! Mill Creek offered some fun onsite macroinvertebrates exploration, including some very active clams. Many kids were amazed to learn that they could flip over rocks in their local creek or pond and find some critters to check out on their own. We also talked about why it's important to explore *gently* whether we're inside or streamside, and all of the lessons about stream health we can learn from aquatic organisms.1. Two white plastic tubs with water, leaves, and rocks on a table with various tools for identifying aquatic organisms. 2. A view of the exhibit hall from the location of our table. 3. Two enthusiastic young participants examining freshwater clams. 4. A video of an active freshwater clam. Many thanks to everyone who came together and made this day happen! #girlscouts #girlscoutsoforegonandswwashington #outdooreducation #macroinvertebrates #stem #willametteheritagecenter

By Webmaster / November 22, 2021
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Fall is in full effect here in the South Santiam, and the council has been busy. This is my favorite time of year to be out- it's beautiful, and each day holds the possibility of Autumn treasures. Brightly colored leaves, fungi in every direction, changed visual displays in creeks and streams as water rises and mobilizes wood and leaves. Take a quick tour through our work so far this week!Photo 1. McDowell Creek near the mouth, where it flows into the South Santiam river. Trees with yellow and orange leaves line a small creek. Photo 2. Restoration and Education Manager, Mike, holds a thermometer mid-creek.Photo 3. Restoration and Education Manager, Mike, holds a thermometer mid-creek. Mike is collecting instantaneous water temperature for calibrating the temperature logger that's deployed here. Photo 4. This resilient yew tree provides shade and nutrients, protecting the streamside and everything that lives in and around the water. Photo 5. McDowell Creek higher up in the watershed. Creek lined by trees with orange and yellow leaves and a small white bridge crossing the bridge. Photo 6. Crabtree Creek, midway up the basin. Broad creek lined by trees with yellow and orange leaves. Photo 7: A close-up of brown and cream colored fungi growing along a small tree trunk. Photo 8. Leaving our parking spot by the creek better than we found it. Mike, on the side of the road above the creek next to a car, holds a bag of trash.On the ancestral lands of the Kalapuya, Tsankupi and Santiam peoples.

By Webmaster / October 27, 2021
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ODOT is closing U.S. 20 on September 8-10 to install two culverts under the highway, between House Rock Campground and Sheep Creek. Plan ahead and allow extra time to use the signed detour routes while the road is closed. Find out more information by visiting the project webpage linked in our bio.

By Webmaster / August 23, 2021
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This is Mike. He's the one on the left, facing a group of students who want to learn more about the natural world through the lens of salmon ecology. Mike is part of a cadre of folks who meet young learners by the creek during Salmon Watch trips. He is about to share some knowledge about water quality and what it can tell us about the watery world of salmon. Is Mike prepared? Heck yes he is. How is he so good at what he does? Training.Want to be like Mike? Come to one of our upcoming Salmon Watch volunteer trainings and we'll show you how!Trainings are August 26 (Waterloo Park) and September 11 (Albany Senior Center). More information at LBSW.org and on our website– just follow the link in our bio!📸: Adult man talking to group of middle school aged students across a table that has tools for testing water quality. They are standing along a river under leafy trees.#salmonwatch #lbsw #everykidoutdoors #volunteer #outdooreducation

By Webmaster / August 11, 2021
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Exciting news! Oregon is releasing a new salmon license plate design that will be available starting September 1. Special fees from sales of the license plates go to the Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board (OWEB) to help fund salmon habitat protection and restoration. The original plates launched in 1998 and, so far, have earned more than $8 million dollars.To help promote the new plates, the Oregon Conservation Partnership is hosting a special eBay auction for low-numbered "first run," plates SM 00001 through SM 00020. This is a fundraiser to support salmon recovery in Oregon and the winning bidder for each plate gets to select one of several state-wide, environmental non-profit organizations to receive their donation (bid price). Bids must be placed by 5PM on July 30th, 2021, so time is of the essence.If you win the auction, you get a sweet, new, low-numbered salmon plate.  You can then choose to designate that the proceeds go to Network of Oregon Watershed Councils.  Your donation to NOWC will help support technical training for Watershed Council staff members state-wide.A link to more information on the new salmon plates, including how to bid, is in our bio.  For more information on NOWC, please visit their website at oregonwatersheds.org!

By Webmaster / July 27, 2021
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Linn-Benton Salmon Watch brings young learners outside to experience the world through the lens of salmon ecology. This program is only possible due to the collaboration and mutual support of many partners in Linn and Benton Counties. The LBSW steering committee members are excited to announce that we are seeking a volunteer coordinator for this year's field trips! This temporary, paid position will work in both an office setting AND a field setting, helping recruit, train, and support volunteers, who are vital to make each trip a success. The full announce is linked in our bio, and you are welcome to DM with questions! 1. Photo of a group of elementary school kids standing on a gravel bar next to a river with a canopy of leafy trees in fall colors of yellow and orange.#linnbentonsalmonwatch #nochildleftinside #outdoororegon #outdooreducation

By Webmaster / July 8, 2021
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Salmon Watch is a FREE experiential field trip for 5th and 6th grade students that focuses on salmon and healthy watersheds. The Linn-Benton Salmon Watch is coordinated by @calapooiawatershedcouncil, @bentonswcd, @southsantiamwc, @odfw_conservation, and @u.s.forestservice.It takes a huge volunteer effort to carry out these field trips each fall and we know recruitment will be particularly challenging in 2021. That's why we are asking for community support to hire a volunteer coordinator so that we can meet the challenge and continue to provide students with this amazing outdoor experience!To support the program, please visit our gofundme campaign: https://charity.gofundme.com/o/en/campaign/salmon-watch-volunteer-coordinator. The link is also available in our bio. To learn more about Linn-Benton Salmon Watch visit: lbsw.orgThank you for your support!#salmonwatch #outdooreducation

By Webmaster / June 3, 2021
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We are happy to be back in our local creeks and streams as we deploy sensors for our 2021 stream temperature monitoring season!You never what you'll find in the field! This week we saw stonefly exuvia or the empty exoskeleton left behind as the nymph transforms into it's winged adult form!We also came across a large freshwater mussel, likely a western ridged mussel. These filter feeders are more pollution tolerant compared to some mussels, but they are not found in highly polluted waters.

By Webmaster / May 14, 2021
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